Moby Dick is Here to Stay

Set shot with mast and crew
Captain Ahab (Roger Honeywell) tells the Pequod’s crew that ‘the fire of St. Elmo’ which illuminated the ship in a storm ‘is good luck’

Here’s a fact. Keeping up a blog, even with the low threshold of three-four posts per month, is hard. I had a nice steady flow going in December and January, but it’s been a few weeks since I’ve posted, and the guilt it awful. Perhaps I’ve been overthinking it. My intention–in general–is to do advance leg work and to post well enough in advance of an upcoming production driving distance from CLE (or Met in HD) to have a chance of influencing someone to give the opera a try. Well, I missed the boat with Pittsburgh Opera’s marvelous production of Moby Dick. That ship has sailed. (OK, enough seafaring puns.) The production wrapped up on Sunday, March 25, so it’s too late to encourage you to go see it this time around, but I’m telling you, this is an opera that’s going to have some staying power. This is a rare contemporary opera that I feel confident is going to become a fixture in the standard repertoire.

Eight things I loved about Pittsburgh’s Moby Dick:

  1.  The libretto is great.  Gene Scheer has managed to turn this behemoth of a novel into a crisp script that covers a lot of ground in just about two-and-a-half hours. He does this by choosing just four days from the many months out at sea, four days that get to the heart of the Pequod‘s doomed voyage, selected to set the scene, show the passage of time, the restlessness of the crew, and the mania of their captain. And to get us to the fateful day when the crew finally meets the whote whale—and its fate.
  2. The music is great, and–pleasant surprise–a lot more melodious than a lot of contemporary writing.  Jake Heggie, who also composed the opera version of Dead Man Walking, is the real deal.  With just two lulls, one in each act, Heggie’s score drives this intense sea journey inexorably to its tragic conclusion.
  3. The set was amazing. Check out the picture above.  The main mast dominates the stage, letting us know we’re on a ship and creating a whole new plane for action.  The mast is surrounded by a turntable that was able to be moved qucikly not only to suggest a variety of spaces but also to create a sense of fast action during whale chase scenes.  The surrounding map of the world and dynamically lit sky made for a truly captivating backdrop for the action.
  4. Key performers were excellent.  Lead tenor Roger Honeywell, whose brooding Ahab lumbers slowly along in Act I, picked this piece up and carried in on his back in Act II.  In a chilling depiction of how easily a charismatic leader can lead a mob toward his goals, Ahab (below left) whips his crew into a frenzied chant of “Kill Moby Dick.”  Baritone Michael Mayes (below right, top) was amazing as Starbuck.  For me, the heart of the show was Starbucks’s aria at the end of Act I–the moral heart of the piece, and the moment of greatest heartbreak–when he comes upon a sleeping Ahab and passes on the opportunity to save the crew by murdering the captain. If only he had been able to stop Ahab’s manic quest here.  Finally, the relationship between Greenhorn (whom readers know as Ishmael) and Queequeg was tenderly rendered by Sean Panikkar and Musa Ngqungwana.
  5. Use of dancers was very cool, especially when dancers took “thrown” harpoons in hand and leapt across the stage with them to suggest the trajectory of the harpoons and the subsequent “sleigh ride.”
  6. A few more personal notes.  A personal highlight was taking my friend Mark to his first live opera and having him enjoy it.

    Mark and I in Pittsburgh
    No one would have guessed when we became friends 38 years ago that Mark Altstadt and I would celebrate our 50th birthdays at the opera.
  7. Sitting next to the lovely Ashley Fabian, a soprano and resident artist who will sing Gretel in the main stage production of Hansel & Gretel in the fall. We just by chance ended up seated next to her, and she was gracious enough to chat with us before the curtain rose and during intermission, offering us an insider’s insight.  I’m hopeful The Opera Evangelist’s readers will get to know Ashley (left) via a guest post this fall! AshleyFabianHeadshot_(002)
  8. Having attended the workshop for educators with the amazing Marilyn Egan (below right), I really knew what to expect going in. Advance preparation really does enhance the experience, and Marilyn does a great job.

    Marilyn Egan Teaches Moby Dick Workshop
    Pittsburgh Opera’s Director of Education, Marilyn Egan, PhD, leads a workshop for educators on March 1.

Having attended four operas in Pittsburgh over the past few years, Pittsburgh Opera is starting to feel like a home away from home.  It’s an easy drive from Cleveland, and if you can get past all the Steelers garb, Pittsburgh’s a really fun city.  I recommend putting an upcoming production at Pittsburgh Opera on your calendar!

–All production photos David Bachman Photography for Pittsburgh Opera.

 

 

 

 

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First Impressions: First-time Opera-goer Rachel Elson

On Saturday, February 24, I had the pleasure of taking Rachel Elson, a family friend, to her first opera.  We attended the live Met in HD presentation of Puccini’s La Bohème, featuring the amazing Sonya Yoncheva as Mimi.  Afterward, I asked Rachel to share some of her impressions.

Rachel Elson NYC Photo
Rachel Elson, mere blocks from the Met, in September 2017.

The Opera Evangelist:  This was your first experience of opera. What did you think?

RE:  What a cool art form!

I was fascinated by how intimate and emotional the performances were. Every scene was packed with intense feeling, positive or negative, in a way that radiated from the screen and through their voices. Because people express and perform emotions differently, I couldn’t help but feel that each actor was bringing their own unique qualities and interpretations to the role. This makes me think that it would be awesome to see the same operas performed with different singers or produced differently.

OE:  Many people don’t realize that operas today feature supertitles (or in the case of the cinema presentations, subtitles) offering simultaneous translation. Some people find subtitles off-putting. Did you have any difficulties following the story or getting used to the subtitles?

RE:  I occasionally ignored the English captions in order to construct meaning solely from the singing, body language, and facial expressions. This proved to be a surprisingly reliable way to follow the narrative, and it helped immerse me in the story, because I was able to create the story for myself as it progressed.

OE:  That’s really cool. I’m glad you gave yourself that opportunity. I like to do that sometimes, too. I wonder if that aspect of the experience was even more satisfying during the live HD broadcast, because camera work allows you to get a closer up view than at the opera house.

RE:  It was definitely worth seeing the Live Met in HD broadcast! I was surprised to discover how intimate the Met in HD experience was. I’m accustomed to the in-your-face nature of live, in-person theater performances, and I assumed that seeing a broadcast performance (although live) simply wouldn’t be the same. However, I felt no sense of disconnection between myself and the characters and narrative of La Bohème while I sat in the Cedar Lee Theater. With the screen occupying almost my whole field of vision, I felt deeply embedded in every scene and touched by the intense emotions of the opera; the impressive sound quality placed me right in the front row at the Met.

The incredible behind-the-scenes features during the intermissions of the live broadcast were another unexpected treat. Rather than removing me from Puccini’s Parisian landscape, the interviews and set backstage explorations brought me so much closer to the work as a whole. I gained insight into the process of production and added a huge amount of depth to my appreciation of the narrative itself. Much like reading about the plot and history of the opera in advance to its showing strengthened my understanding, these features were enlightening in a way I wouldn’t have found elsewhere.

OE:  Was there anything you didn’t like? Were there aspects of the production that seemed weird or old-fashioned?

RE:  The pacing of the production seemed so strange. The first act was heavy on exposition, and accordingly very lengthy. The second act, however, I feel like nothing much happened and it was over very quickly (although I did really enjoy the vast set and chorus). Same as well with the third act. These were very, very dramatic scenes but it seemed like the story didn’t progress very much! In summary—much ado about nothing.

I felt that the opera was awash in “grand” feelings and lacking in complexity. I think that this might be the nature of opera itself (very grand, awesome), and for me it’s both a good and bad thing. I wanted more nuance to the narrative and feelings, as this would’ve brought the production more into the present, which would make it easier to relate to, but maybe that’s a difficult balance to strike when the narrative is full of such strong emotions (happiness, love, despair, jealousy).

OE:  These observations, I think, may be particular to La Bohème, which is structured more as a collection of scenes rather than along the lines of a traditional plot. (In fact, the novel on which Puccini drew inspiration for the opera, Scènes de la Vie de Bohème, is comprised of a series of vignettes of the artistic life in 1830s Paris.”  I don’t think you’d have that feeling with every opera, especially most operas written after the height of the bel canto era in the early 19th Century.

So, will you come back?

RE:  Definitely. Overall I really, really enjoyed it.

OE:  What would you tell someone who’s never been to an opera to encourage her to attend?

RE:  Opera is a worthwhile challenge. It feels unusual in the powerful intensity of the emotions being performed on stage, and this moving quality is a huge draw that is hard to achieve in film or theater. Whether you see it live on stage or on the screen, the artistry, craftsmanship of the set, and strong narratives create a completely immersive experience and ease the introduction to a new kind of art. Most of all, it’s rewarding to see a relationships develop and a story slowly emerge from such beautiful music.

A (Mostly) Puccini Quiz

Test your knowledge of opera with the following short quiz (answers below).  I’ll send a prize to the first three (3) subscribers who let me know in the comments that they got 5/5 correct.

1.  In Puccini’s Tosca, which was broadcast live in HD in cinemas last month, the line “the kiss of Tosca” refers to:

a.  The moment when the painter Cavaradossi musses Tosca’s hair in the church

b.  Tosca’s jealousy of the beautiful blonde woman Cavaradossi has used as a model for Mary Magdalene

c.  The stab wound with which Tosca slays the evil Scarpia

d.  The passionate final embrace Tosca and Cavaradossi share at the end of the opera

2.  Which of the following operas, composed by the 19th Century German composer Engelbert Humperdinck–based on the Grimms’ fairy tale–will be performed at the Cleveland Institute of Music from February 28 to March 3, 2018?

a.  Hansel and Gretel                  c.  The Twelve Brothers

b.  Rapunzel                                 d.  Cinderella

3.  The 2017-18 Met in HD season features at least one opera by each of the big three major 19th Century bel canto composers.  Which of the following, though in Italian, is not from that period?

a.  Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore              c.  Rossini’s Semiramide

b.  Mozart’s Cosí Fan Tutte                     d.  Bellini’s Norma

4.  Which of the following operas by Giacomo Puccini was the basis for the wildly popular and critically acclaimed musical Rent:

a.  Turandot                              c.  La Bohème

b.  Tosca                                    d.  Madama Butterfly

5.  Which of the following operas by Giacomo Puccini was the basis for the wildly popular and critically acclaimed musical Miss Saigon:

a.  Turandot                                 c.  La Bohème

b.  Tosca                                       d.  Madama Butterfly

Answers. 

  1. C     Ouch!
  2. A     Hansel and Gretel.  Order tickets at the CIM box office or at www.cim.edu.
  3. B     Mozart’s Cosí Fan Tutte, which, while not usually lumped into the bel canto operas, certainly features a lot of “beautiful singing.”  Catch it at your local cinema on March 31 or April 4, 2018.
  4. C     La Bohème, which will be broadcast to audiences worldwide this Saturday.  If you’re in Cleveland, please join me at the Cedar Lee 12:30 P.M. Saturday or 6:30 P.M. Wednesday.  (First timers are always on me!)
  5. D     Madama Butterfly, which the Cleveland Opera Theater will be bringing to the stage at the Maltz Performing Arts Center on April 27 and 29, 2018!  Order your tickets today!

The Elixir of Love

How to Fall in Love with Italian Opera in Five Easy Steps

  1. Get the Elixir of Love on your calendar.

Figure out which local movie theater is screening the Met in HD presentation of Donizetti’s romantic comedy, L’Elisir d’Amore, the perfect alternative to fighting the restaurant crowds on Valentine’s Day. (Or, if you’ve already got set plans for the 14th, check out the live broadcast this Saturday at 12:55 PM.)

Kittie and I at the Met, 2018-01-16
At the Met with my love, Jan. 2018
  1. Get familiar with some of the music.

Go to YouTube and listen to several great tenors singing “Una Furtiva Lagrima” (“A Furtive Tear), one of the most famous opera songs ever written. The aria, which appears near the end of the opera, celebrates the moment when the peasant Nemorino realizes at long last that the woman he loves loves him back. If you don’t find yourself stirred by this showstopper, you are at low risk of falling in love with Italian opera. If on the other hand, you find yourself drawn to the music and the emotion it conveys, dig around and find a few more of the opera’s famous songs: “Quanto amore” or “Vogilo dire” or “Prendi, prendi.”

  1. Get cozy.

Grab a date and rub his or her feet or back while playing a few of these lovely songs in the background. Add some flowers, candles, a little Amoretto… use your imagination. Encourage your amour not to fret about understanding the lyrics at this point. Getting familiar with some of the melodies will give you a few familiar spots on game day, which will help to pull you in and make you feel like part of what’s going on.

  1. Sneak some mini-bottles of champagne into the cinema.

Or, if popcorn and diet coke is more your thing, make time to hit the concession stand on the way to you seat. If the idea that opera is snooty is one of the things that’s been putting you off, the opera-in-cinema experience is totally different. Grab your favorite movie theater snacks and munch away!

  1. Sit back, relax, and enjoy.

Don’t be thrown by the subtitles. Within minutes you’ll be drawn into the music and the story, and you’ll forget you’re reading.

Bonus step: Repeat frequently, varying the dose as needed. Puccini’s La Bohème is coming up next on the Met in HD, Saturday 2/24 (live) and Wednesday 2/28 (encore).

My words–beautifully sung!

5 Cool Things about Living in the N.O.W.

Not sure why, but I’ve not yet ever posted anything in this blog about my own participation in the creation of a new opera.  Well, today’s the day.  Tempting though it is to devote this week’s post to urging you to attend tomorrow’s Met in HD Encore of Tosca–you should!–or this weekend’s Aïda at Opera Columbus–can’t wait!–I need instead for today’s post to be a personal one.

Fourteen months ago, in November 2016, I approached then sophomore at Kent State University Scott Little about a possible collaboration on opera.  (I write words, not music, so if I wanted to play in this game, I was going to need to find a willing composer.)  The collaboration has been even more amazing than I’d hoped, and this past Saturday, we had the pleasure of hearing two wonderful professional singers sing a twelve-minute excerpt from the opera we’ve been working on.  It was awesome!  Slotted into the New Opera Forum session of Cleveland Opera Theater’s New Opera Works (N.O.W.) Festival, those twelve exquisite minutes were sandwiched between a panel discussion about the creation of new opera works and an audience talk-back about our opera in progress, The Story of an Hour, based on the Kate Chopin story of the same name.

Here are 5 things that were awesome about the experience:

Scott Little Directs NOW Rehearsal 2018-01-25
Composer Scott Little rehearses Tim Culver and Rachel Copeland at the Maltz Performing Arts Center.
  1.  Having family and close friends in the audience to hear words I’d written sung so beautifully.
  2. The stunning voices and gracious support of soprano Rachel Copeland and tenor Timothy Culver.
  3. Hearing such significant improvement in the Scott Little’s composition in the less than two months since we had a chance to hear five Kent State University vocal performance majors sing through the piece on December 1.
  4. Seeing Scott, who just turned 21 last month, blossom in the opportunity to direct rehearsals with professional singers for the first time in his young career.
  5. Coming away from the weekend more confident than ever that a) we will get a fully staged version of this one-act opera produced one day soon (don’t resist any temptation you might feel to send money to help with production costs) and b) that The Story of an Hour will not be the last opera for either me or Scott.  In fact, I hope it won’t be our last opera together.

Now, go find a movie theater near you presenting Puccini’s Tosca tomorrow night–you won’t regret it!

Lost Homeland: an Interview with Composer Dawn Sonntag

Scene from premiere at Hiram College of Verlorene Heimat
Jason Bud, center, in the premiere of “Verlorene Heimat” at Hiram College, will also appear in the Cleveland Opera Theater production.

The Opera Evangelist had the pleasure of chatting with Hiram College professor, vocalist, pianist, and composer Dawn Sonntag, whose opera Verlorene Heimat (Lost Homeland) will be performed on Saturday, January 27 at 7:30 P.M. and Sunday, January 28 at 3 P.M. at the Maltz Performing Arts Center in University Circle. The performances are part of Cleveland Opera Theater’s N.O.W. festival. The opera, which depicts the experiences of an “East Prussian refugee family and the Jewish-Ukranian girl they sheltered,” is based on a true story told to Sonntag by her mother-in-law.

Opera Evangelist: You’ve shared with me that you started thinking about composing an opera in 2009.  What made you decide that you wanted to try that form.  Are you a passionate opera fan?

Dawn Sonntag: As a child, I used to create “musical shows,” forcing my younger siblings to rehearse and perform, creating sets with my bedroom furniture, and dragging my parents to my room to see our shows, and I sang in musicals in elementary and high school.  I did not have opportunities to see opera as a child, but my father has a beautiful singing voice and used to listen to the Met broadcasts that were aired Sunday afternoons, and my parents had a friend who was an opera singer, so the idea of opera was not completely foreign to me as a child.  At the same time, I had always loved theater and creative writing.  My doctorate from the University of Minnesota is in both voice and composition, and I have performed opera as a singer and worked as a vocal coach/accompanist with singers in the U.S. and in Germany, where I was a substitute repetiteur for the Heidelberg Opera Theater.  So opera seems like a natural fit for me as a composer; the idea of composing opera had always been there for me, but I did not want to commit the time to composing opera without knowing when and where it would be performed; it is a large time commitment. When I started teaching at Hiram College in 2008 and took over the opera workshop program, I decided the time had come to realize this idea and to compose something that students could perform.

OE: After casting about for a libretto for a while,  you decided to write your own.  What were the challenges of finding a libretto?  Did you consider and reject several, or was it more a matter of finding a librettist?

DS: I looked at a few librettos that writers had submitted to the American Composers’ Forum opportunities listings, but I could not connect to the topics and themes I found. A good friend of mine, Gracia Grindal, a writer and now professor emerita of Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, had written a moving and dramatic libretto based on historical novels about Norwegian immigrants, but the copyright owners would not give her rights to the story, so I could not set that.  And I think because I like to write myself, I realized that maybe I could write my own libretto .

Dawn Sonntag Portrait
Composer Dawn Sonntag

OE: You were discouraged by some from writing an opera that offers a sympathetic portrayal of ethic Germans during World War II.  Why did you feel that this was a story that needed to be told?

DS: I thought it was important to show how private citizens who had been deceived by Hitler’s promises to “make Germany great again”—and Hitler uses that phrase in his speeches—withdrew their support for the Nazis and became resistors, even risking their lives to do what was right, once they realized that Hitler was a dangerous and destructive fraud. I also wanted to show how an entire culture was destroyed because of its initial support for this demagogue and how even small villages were divided because of politics.  The Germans in East Prussia had their own beautiful, rural culture, and not only did they lose it because of the war, but more than 300,000 of them died in that winter of 1945 as they tried to escape. The story of the Germans living in Eastern Europe who were trapped between the Nazis and Russians and either forced to flee to western Germany or trapped in what is now Poland or Russia is not widely known, even though there are actually many of these former refugees living in Cleveland now, especially in the Tremont area.  I also saw such strength in Elise, who refused to bow to small-town social pressure to support the Nazis and who not only had the composure to secretly prepare for the evacuation, risking her life to do so, but also refused to treat Hedwig like a slave although she was a forced laborer and kept her Jewish heritage a secret, which was also very risky considering that Elise had already been threatened with being sent to a labor camp.   The weight of war that women carry is often overlooked. My mother-in-law was very upset about the increasing neo-Nazi activity in Germany, and she was afraid that once her generation had passed on, this activity would increase as the memories of World War II were forgotten.

OE: You took this opera from it’s first few bars to full student production in a very short period of time.  Tell us about that.

DS: Between 2009, when my mother-in-law told me the story, and September 2013, when I actually started writing the music and libretto, I had mulled over the idea, but I also had several other commissions for chamber music and choral pieces during that time and a heavy teaching load, so I had written neither a libretto nor a note of music. And I had attempted to start writing the libretto, but it felt stilted and I kept discarding what I wrote. Part of the problem was lack of time to think and concentrate.   But in the fall of 2013, I was approved for a 12-week pre-tenure sabbatical from Hiram College. The following spring, I was scheduled to teach the opera workshop course. I  decided to dedicate my sabbatical to composing this opera, and I set a goal of having a workable score printed and ready to distribute to students by the start of the spring semester in January.   During the summer of 2013, just before my sabbatical started, I read Roger McKee’s book entitled Story, which is about screenwriting, and came up with an order of scenes and what was happening in each scene. In late August and early September, I spent three weeks in Visby, Sweden, which is on the Island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea, at a composer residency as part of the residency program at the International Centre for Composers that is sponsored by the Swedish government. This gave me three weeks of uninterrupted work time, as well as time to talk walks along the Baltic Sea.  While I was there, I completed the initial draft of the duet between Elise and August and came up with basis for the musical material for the rest of the opera.  When I got home, I made a goal of completing one scene a week, and it flowed well. Getting started is always the hard part.

Getting started is always the hard part.

OE: What were the challenges of composing an opera?  How was it different from other composing experiences you’ve had?  What was the biggest challenge?

DS: Composing an hour of continuous music seemed daunting, but once I started, it flowed naturally and became less and less scary.  In fact, I found that immersing myself in the story and characters as I was writing the music was freeing.  And since I wrote the libretto, I was free to create a text that worked well musically and vocally.  The biggest challenge is time, I think.  My best work happens mid-day, after my mind has warmed up but before I am tired, and I am usually teaching during that time. And then on the weekends one has to deal with the other obligations of life and catch up on rest.   Committing to composing an opera also means saying no to other smaller compositional opportunities—chamber music, choral pieces, etc.   So one has to set priorities and try to create a schedule that allows one to compose when one feels fresh and creative.

OE: For your next opera, what are you looking for in a libretto?  Do you feel that there are stories that lend themselves better to opera than to other forms?  Why?

DS: I am especially drawn to librettos that make history come alive and help the audience connect with the past in a personal way.  I could imagine that some stories might be better told without music, as theater works rather than opera, just as I feel that music can get in the way of some poetry, but whether a story lends itself to opera really depends on the composer’s personality and imagination.  And flow and beauty of the language—the vowels and consonants—are important to me when setting a text to music. This past summer, I attended a program in Halifax, Nova Scotia entitled “Opera from Scratch,” in which six composers create one-act, ten-minute operas for a solo singer, who is paired with the composer.  The composers and singers then spend a week together rehearsing and performing the new works. All of the composers at last year’s festival composed their own librettos, and it was fascinating to see the wide variety of subject matters and settings. This is what I love about opera—it is such a diverse art form, full of creative possibility.

OE: Opera seems to be undergoing a revival in the US.  New opera festivals have been emerging over the past several years, and many of the major opera houses have commissioned or are featuring new opera works.  How hopeful are you for the future of the art form?

DS: I am excited to see opera blossoming in the U.S and optimistic about its future.  Opera is and can be so much more than many people realize.  I am glad to see it becoming more accessible to audiences of all ages and socio-economic levels through the efforts of directors of new, small opera companies and through education programs of larger companies.

OE: What are you listening to these days?

DS: I still practice and perform regularly as a pianist and singer and conductor, and I am always studying and playing scores that I use in teaching music theory, composition, and voice as well, so all of that is part of my “listening” experience.  And when I study an opera score, I do it at the piano, playing through it.  I do not sit and listen to music much without a score; and I can’t listen while I am driving or cooking – I can’t “see” and listen to music at the same time, and I forget where I am and what I am doing. Last fall I accompanied rehearsals the Bach B-Minor Mass for a semi-professional choir, Kantorei, in Spokane, and I will be singing with that choir this spring, so am learning rep for that, for example, Morten Lauridsen’s Mid-Winter Songs.  I love early music and want to put together an ensemble to perform Leonhard Lechner’s Passion, so I have been listening to recordings of that with a score I have.  The other day, a friend reminded me about Fauré’s nocturnes for piano, so I decided to find those and play through a few of them, and earlier last fall I played through Scriabin’s preludes and made my way through his piano sonatas. I also listen to a lot of new works by composer friends of mine and to works by composers whose music is new to me, like Robert Kyr, whose name I have known for a long time but whose music I only discovered a few months ago. In the past year I have heard new operas by about twelve different composers at festivals in Hartford, Halifax, and Cleveland.  Recently I listened to Margaret Brouwer’s opera about Lake Erie, Voice of the Lake—such an evocative and moving work.  I’ve also been listening to new, energetic chamber music written and performed by ensembles like Eighth Blackbird and avante-garde music by composers like Amy Beth Kirsten. So although I feel that opera composing is where I would like to concentrate my efforts as a composer, I listen to and perform a wide variety of music.

The Long Walk brings the horrors of the Iraq war to the stage

Think Opera Doesn’t Connect to Real Life?

Pittsburgh The Long Walk

If one barrier to getting into opera is the sense that opera doesn’t connect to real life, attending Pittsburgh Opera’s upcoming production of The Long Walk will certainly change that. Based on Brian Castner’s memoir The Long Walk: A Story of War and the Life that Follows, the opera covers challenging physical and emotional terrain that will be familiar to viewers of American Sniper and even more directly of Hurt Locker. The “long walk” of the title refers to the experience of the soldier who, when remote efforts failed, must put on an 80-pound blast suit and manually dismantle an explosive device. In the course of this work, soldiers are exposed to repeated blasts at close range. Castner, who lead an Explosive Ordnance Device (EOD) team is Iraq, returned from war with blast–induced neurotrauma (BINT), a debilitating brain condition caused by repeated exposure to blast waves from explosions. The symptoms, familiar to anyone who’s been paying attention to the NFL’s issues with CTE, include otherwise unexplained anger, confusion, attention and cognitive challenges, impaired decision-making, and sleep deprivation.

The opera, which takes place in and around Brian’s home in Buffalo, New York—and in Brian’s mind—depicts compellingly the challenges of coping with life back home, with the ghosts of war, and with the changes to his brain caused by BINT. Coping proves enormously difficult for Brian (beautifully sung by baritone Benjamin Taylor) and his family, as Brian’s brain trauma makes it difficult to remember details of his children’s earlier childhood and leads him at one point to arming the family car to protect his children en route to school. As his wife Jessie (compellingly performed by mezzo-soprano Leah de Gruyl) tries to hold the family together, Brian turns to running in and around Buffalo to try to outrun “the Crazy.” His marriage, his family life, and his sense of sanity all fraying dangerously, Brian at last finds self-understanding and a path to healing with the guidance of “the Shrink.”

Composer Jeremy Howard Beck and librettist Stephanie Fleischmann had worked together at the American Lyric Theater’s Composer Librettist Development Program, but had not planned to write a full-length opera together until they were called “out of the blue” with a commission from ALT. Receiving news of the commission filled them with “equal parts excitement and terror,” Beck told Pittsburgh-area teachers gathered for an all-day workshop dedicated to The Long Walk and the upcoming Ashes & Snow. “It was an arranged marriage. We read a lot and talked to each other, and we soon realized that there was very little overlap in our interests.” One day, Beck walked through a bookstore texting Fleischmann pics of book covers of recent releases. The Long Walk caught her eye, and a few days later she told Beck he needed to read it. According to Pittsburgh Opera’s education department, in Castner’s memoir the two had found “a story that demanded to be sung and that would hit the ‘sweet spot’ between the introspective, poetic librettist and the emphatic, thrill-seeking composer.”  Brian Castner, who was surprised to be approached about turning his memoir into an opera, co-operated generously with the project.

Attendees will find themselves moved by the heart-wrenching difficulties of Brian’s story as well as by the beautiful singing of Pittsburgh Opera’s Resident Artists’ cast, and I believe, compelled to reconsider some old notions about opera being disconnected from our lives and times.